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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 66 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the pentagon and immediately i ordered the deployment of these forces. >> in between 9:42 p.m. benghazi time when the first attack started at 5:00 p.m. when they lost their lives, what conversations it either of you have was secretary clinton/ -- would secretary clinton? >> would not have any conversations with secretary clinton. >> is the same trooper you -- true for you? my time is expired. senator we ask you about securing the compound in 23 days to do so. -- and the 23 days to do so. we saw news crews seeing sensitive documents. you said that you were not requested to secure the compound. had you been requested to secure the compound, the u.s. military could have done so effectively. >> yes. >> thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> you can watch more on their testimony on the attack on the consulate's in benghazi. next, a feral ceremony for outgoing defense secretary leon panetta. president obama and the joint chiefs of staff paid tribute to him. the ceremony included members from all of the u.s. arm
the nomination of a defense secretary. so we are in a war, and we have nobody running the pentagon. thank you, republicans. and meetteorites strike a town in russia's ural mountains. let's get the update from lisa ferguson standing buy out in los angeles. >> hey, bill good morning, everyone. president obama is on the road but first off he is hosting the italian president who is ending his term in. this will serve as a fairrewell. he will speak at hyde park academy about his state of the union address and his plans to strengthen the middle class. he is spending time until palm city, florida. the president is pushing his plan for universal pre-school this week. but that could run into road blocks thanks to republican lawmakers who say early learning programs are not effective. >> that's despite an increasing amount of evidence on the benefits of childhood education programs, including higher high school graduation rates and reduced teen pregnancy and crime. some research actually suggests every single dollar invested in pre-kinder garden programs saves $7 down th
. jenna: we researched the pentagon for a independent staff we haven't got it yet. we have the research department said if we had revisions in afghanistan over the years and we haven't found any. they told the associated press doesn't tell the full story of progress against the taliban. >> fair enough. it is a snapshot, not the movie. once again i think it is pretty important when the administration uses this. panetta said last year that attacks were down in afghanistan in 2012. it doesn't seem to be the case. if we need to get more answers. jenna: we'll look for more information. we continue to cover the story throughout the day here on fox news. peter, thanks for your insight. >> thanks for having me. jon: one town's attempt to go green has some folks seeing red amid complaints wind turbines are making people sick. all this could end up costing taxpayers millions. we're live with that story. >>> plus, what do you get when you cross a rodeo, kids and sheep? the answer is on the way. [ male announcer ] how do you measure happiness? by the armful? by the barrelful? e carful? how about...
he's more than ready to leave washington. let's go to pentagon correspondent barbara starr. she joins us live. he can't leave just yet, right, barbara? >> well, jim, he made it as far as his home in california. the question is, is he really still defense secretary? this should have been leon panetta's final appearance as secretary of defense. >> my office is packed up, sylvia is packing at home. i'm ready to go. >> a ceremony for former secretary of state, hillary clinton, who already made it out the door. >> it is probably a good thing at this point in time that we have a chance to get some damn rest. >> but as panetta was saying good-bye -- >> on this vote, the yes are 58 and the nays are 62. >> falling short of the votes needed to break a filibuster. keeping panetta, for now, from his retirement. but not from his immediate plans. panetta flew home to his california walnut farm as he does on many weekends. on tuesday, he comes back to washington and then on to brus brussels for a nato summit. on friday, he returns. but will he go back to work at the pentagon or go back home? >> leon
to start with a washington battle on full display this week when the president's pick to head the pentagon, former republican senator chuck hagel, came under fire from members of his own party during a very contentious confirmation hearing. >> name one person in your opinion who's intimidated by the israeli lobby in the united states senate. >> are we right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. >> senator hagel, please answer the question i asked. today, do you think unilateral sanctions would be a bad idea? >> all this raising questions about how effective chuck hagel will be if confirmed as secretary of defense. earlier this weekend, i sat down for a rare joint interview with the top military leadership the outgoing secretary f defense leon panetta and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff general martin dempsey. >>> secretary panetta, welcome back to "meet the press." general dempsey, welcome. let me start with the man that is poised to take your place. he underwent on thursday a pretty tough round of questioning. he seemed to struggle with a lot of the answers. of cou
to the money spent, but is anyone actually looking? what dollar goes out of the pentagon to a contractor in iraq and what we're getting. >> we pay a premium, the green zone is very limited. a lot of these people are literally sitting there twiddling their thumbs because they can't get away from the embassy compound. i think it's a huge waste. >> greta: why are we paying them a premium if they can't do anything? >> again, this is where we're' trying to push the president to say, this should not stand. >> greta: we've been in iraq for, you know, for 10 or 11 years and this doesn't just come up now. this is pouring into the war and whatever you want to call it now for 10 or 11 years and has anyone actually gone back to see where we've spent money. what we've got for it and whether or not it's simply just bloat? >> oh, absolutely. a special inspector general for afghan reconstruction and they called the cigar and then the cigeur. and the special inspector and we don't hear about it in the press. >>. >> greta: and the money, do we get it back. >> no, no. >> greta: what do you mean we don't ge
level that he had been waterboarded. he had practiced at the pentagon. he had been working on this. but when he referred to containment on iran rather than prevention of nuclear weapons and had to be corrected and then corrected again, a note was passed to him, and then the chairman helpfully said to him, containment is not a policy at all. that is not our policy. that is such a critical mistake on an issue that he knew that he was going to be asked about. we knew that he was going to have to explain the, quote, jewish lobby and take that back and some of the other things. the way he did it didn't seem crisp. and then when ted cruz wheeled in the tv screen to play an al jazeera talk show and put him on the spot or how he defended israel or didn't defend israel in response to a question on a talk show, it would be like somebody saying to you or mika, joe, you were on c-span ten years ago, and what did you say to someone who called in? that was very, very tough. >> that was sort of my point at the top. >> it's interesting that you had said, mika, yesterday as we were going to a meeti
was also inducted into the hall of heroes at the pentagon and honored with a parade. since then meyer has raised more than a million dollars to help send the children of wounded marines to college. and finally, as you have all seen, he is the author of "into the fire: a firsthand account of the most extraordinary battle in the afghan war." leading authorities is very proud to exclusively represent dakota meyer, and now i want to show you a video to hear more about dakota and his story. thank you. ♪ >> it's kind of frustrating because, you know, everyone wants to get an interview about the worst day of your life. >> it was a straightforward mission that then-21-year-old sergeant dakota meyer had been assigned that day. meyer waited anxiously by the vehicles as his team began their parol of the village on foot. as they approached, all hell l broke loose. more than 50 insurgents fired from positions on mountains surrounding the valley and from within the village. back at the vehicles, meyer heard the firing and could see into the valley. the volume of fire increased, and the radio traffic
are expected to come from the pentagon. a conversation about the government's use of lethal force against suspected terrorists. our guest is christopher anders. then we'll talk with judith for the national partnership. "washington journal" live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> having observed a steady improvement in the opportunities and well being of our citizens, i can report to you that the state of this youthful union is good. >> once again with keeping with time honored tradition i come to report to you on the state of the union. i'm pleased to report that america is much improved and there is good reason to believe that improve will continue. >> my duty tonight is to report on the state of the union. not the state of your government but of your american community and set forth our responsibilities in the words of our founders to form a more perfect union. the state of the union is strong. >> as we gather tonight, our nation is at war, our economy is in recession, and the civilized world faces unprecedented dangers, yet the state of our union has never been stronger. >> it is becau
103 different stem -- science, technologies, engineering and math -- programs within the pentagon alone. consolidating those would save $1.7 billion over the next ten years. these are programs that are not necessarily initiated by congress, by the way. so they do have the flexibility to make those changes. department of defense tuition assistance program totally duplicates our veterans tuition assistance program. so you can do in service have this access to tuition while in service and then have the identical tuition access afterwards and you can claim them both. there's nothing wrong with wanting togy an educational benefit to our troops, but we don't need to do it twice. that's a significant savings of $4.5 billion. alternative energy. we have a department of energy. their whole goal is to work on alternative energy and renewable energy and efficiency within energy. the department of defense is spending $700 million a year on research in alternative energy that totally duplicates everything we're doing everywhere else. so there's $00700 million that we should not be spending at
talk shows and defended the man nominated to succeed him at the pentagon. panetta suggested the tough questioning senator hagel faced during third's capitol hill hearing, was driven by politics. >> it is pretty obvious the political knives were out for chuck hagel. what disappointed me is that they talked a lot about past quotes but what about when a secretary of defense is confronting today? we did not see enough time spent on discussing those issues. in the end that is what counted. >> he says hagel should have been questions about issues like afghanistan, the middle east, and the looming budget cuts at the pentagon but he came underfire for past statements of israel, iran, and u.s. nuclear strategy. at least 12 republicans plan to vote against hagel while only two, so far, have said they would vote for him. that is congress ran of mississippi, and a senator from nebraska. observers on both sides thought hagel did not do such a great job at the hearing. >> disconcerting thing, obviously fox anyone that watched it, he seemed unimpressive and unprepared on the questions that he knew w
's having a really good time. >> love it. thank you. >>> chuck hagel takes over the helm at the pentagon. first day at the job he is shaking up his schedule. chuck hagel. that's next. i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. oh, hi thehey!ill. are you in town for another meeting? yup, i brought my a-team. siness trips add to family time. this is my family. this is joe. hi joe! hi there! earn a ton of extra points with the double your hhonors promotion and feel the hamptonality. i took something for my sinuses, but i still have this cough. [ male announcer ] a lot of sinus products don't treat cough. they don't? [ male announcer ] nope, but alka seltzer plus severe sinus does it treats your worst sinus symptoms, plus that annoying cough. [ breathes deeply ] ♪
your perspective on the pentagon's role in securing our embassies? we just had a near suicide attack, if you will, suicide bomber, at an embassy in turkey just last week. what can be done more than what has been done now? >> the important things to do are first of all you've got to build up the host country capacity. in the end, these embassies do depend on host country, the details that provide security. so you've got to try to develop that. >> this shouldn't be more marines? >> no, no. let me get the rest of the part of it. you have to harden these embassies as much as possible. and third, we have been working with the ste department to determine whether additional marines ought to be assigned to that area. and in the end, the final alternative is our ability to respond in having our troops in a position where they can respond quickly. but i have to tell you, a lot of that still is dependent on whether intelligence tells us that we've got a big problem, and gives us enough warning so that we can get to the place to respond. >> did you have enough time to get there in time? >> no. >
pentagon correspondent barbara starr joins me by phone. barbara, you've been dicking into this. what more do you know? >> this sad story emerged late last night, randi. the pentagon is trying to assemble what they can at this point about the service record of chris kyle and the man taken into custody, 25 years old. he was caught by police in texas after a brief pursuit, has been arraigned on two counts of capital murder. another man was shot along with chris kyle at this shooting range. the initial reports are that the men had gathered there and they were helping this former marine learn to shoot again. chris kyle had been very involved in helping veterans with posttraumatic stress. so there is a belief that the marine -- the suspect may have been involved with posttraumatic stress. i have to tell you, i think all of that still remains under investigation as to exactly what transpired. throughout the navy s.e.a.l. community, special operations forces, really, they are remembering a man who in their mind, their world truly was a legend for what he militarily accomplished during those tours
cuts scheduled to take effect march 1. half the cuts are from the pentagon. we will discuss that with ray locker. and a conversation about the use of lethal force against suspected terrorists. then we will talk about the 22 anniversary of the family and medical leave act. washington journal, live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. tonight, former president bill clinton speaks to a gathering of house democrats. new secretary of state john kerry meets with the canadian foreign minister. then a military farewell for leon panetta. senator ben cardin talks to employees at the national institutes of health. >> first lady helen taft on discussing politics. >> i had always had the satisfaction of knowing almost as much he about the politics and intricacies of any situation. i think any woman can discuss with her husband topics of national interest. i became familiar with more than politics. >> helen taft, whose husband, william howard taft, was the only man to serve as president and supreme court justice. c-span is new original series, first ladies, image and influence. produced with t
rather have the republican do these kind of cuts to the pentagon than a democrat? >> boy, i don't think that was his -- he worked for something that was in the national security space, chuck hagel did, for some period of time. i think he built a relationship with the president. he is a vietnam veteran, a decorated vietnam veteran at that, and that's why the president selected him. the problem was, the senate now and certainly senator reed can talk to him better than i can, having difficulty both sides of the aisle, to see if he's ready and able to lead the pentagon. >> i think mike is exactly right about why he was chosen, he has the experience, not only as a combat veteran, as a business leader and the second deputy head of the v.a. in the reagan administration. he's got the confidence of the president. i don't think this was designed to provoke a fight. i think in fact what's happened is very unusual, unprecedeed review, asking for speeches, going back five years, asking for all sorts of material we've never requested of confirmation before. we're confident that we'll get the confirma
return home, and i admit that when we first asked him to lead the pentagon, his answer was simple -- no. but i kept asking him. i am persistent. that is how michelle married me. i just kept at it, and it is a testament to his patriotism, to his sense of duty, that leon agreed to serve on this one last tour. perhaps it was the memory of his parents and opening their homes up to gi's added to the pacific, perhaps leon served himself, a young lieutenant in the army. perhaps it was the experience of watching his youngest son deployed to afghanistan. what we do know is this -- as our nation's's 23rd secretary of defense and every action beyond panetta has taken, every decision he has made has been with one goal in mind -- taking care of our sons and our daughters in uniform and keeping america safe. just think of the progress under his watch. because we ended the war in iraq, winding down the war in afghanistan, our troops are coming home, and next year our war in afghanistan will come to an end. we have put the core of al qaeda on the path to defeat. we have been relentless against its affi
lawmakers talking about passing what's called transfer authority enabling these agencies, the pentagon and others, to set priorities and not this draconian sequester setup. the white house is saying that they may not be in favor of that. so you have this standoff that it appears the sequester's going to move forward just as it is. jon: we'll just see how bad it is. a lot of people say the politicians are sort of hyping the damage that we can expect starting friday. we'll see. bret baier from "special report." thank you. you can watch bret on "special report," all of the latest political developments, and this is going to be a big week, 6 p.m. eastern right here on fox news channel. jenna: well, u.s. special forces who risk their lives to defend the people of afghanistan, the innocent people of afghanistan, are under fire by the afghan president now. we're going to tell you what's behind hamid karzai's surprising accusations and what it means for our troops in the fight against the taliban. >>> plus, some breaking news from sin city. police naming a prime suspect in a wild shootout that
. as is widely recognized, sequestration over the next 10 years apply to the pentagon budget would only reduce it in inflation adjusted terms to what it was in 2007 a. the most powerful military in the world -- 2007, as the most powerful military in the world engaged in a war in iraq and the challenge in afghanistan. if members of congress pay attention to the facts, they will see a clear path to dramatically reduce pentagon spending without undermining america's position as being the most powerful nation on the planet. and nobody has done a better job of highlighting a path forward, an area of opportunity, than walter pinkus writhing on the pages of the "washington post" over the last couple years as he details the sweep of our nuclear weapons program and the spending trajectory. this morning's latest offering should be required reading for every member of congress and the ones who whine the loutest should be forced to read it -- loudest should be forced to read it twice. he details a vast array of nuclear weapons already deployed, ready to be deployed within 30 minutes, a relic of our conten
. they don't receive combat pay and it's absolutely ridiculous. so recently, the pentagon established that a woman that serves in combat is entitled to receive all of the things that go with it to show our country's appreciation. so it seems to me that if we're going to have a draft and i really believe that if we did have a draft set up that congress would not be so anxious to the democrats and republicans to put our young people in harm's way. >> tell me why you say that because you're introduced this legislation multiple times and it's clearly something you're very committed to. you bet your life because the people in the congress that allow these things to go on, they have no fear that anyone in their community and their families are going to be making any sacrifice at all. less than 1% of americans, most of whom volunteer for economic reasons paid the price in terms of 6600 lives lost, tens of thousands of people wounded. veterans, american veterans coming home, disoriented, unemploy unemployed, some homeless and no one pays a price. i submit to you, we would not be in iraq, afgh
the pentagon, his answer was simple -- no. but i kept asking him. i am persistent. that is how michelle married me. i just kept at it, and it is a testament to his patriotism, to his sense of duty that leon agreed to serve on this one last tour. perhaps it was the memory of his parents opening their homes up to g.i.'s headed to the pacific. perhaps it was leon, who served himself, a young lieutenant in the army. perhaps it was the experience of watching his youngest son deployed to afghanistan. what we do know is this -- as our nation's's 23rd secretary of defense, in every action leon panetta has taken, every decision he has made has been with one goal in mind -- taking care of our sons and our daughters in uniform and keeping america safe. just think of the progress under his watch. because we ended the war in iraq, winding down the war in afghanistan, our troops are coming home, and next year our war in afghanistan will come to an end. we have put the core of al qaeda on the path to defeat. we have been relentless against its affiliates. because we have a sacred obligation to our troops to t
to charlie's child and to her wife. >> right. >> those benefits, the pentagon no matter how much they want to, they can't do those things. >> right. >> because they are precluded by law because of doma. >> and secretary panetta and the president, they did all they could under the law. and that's what a lot of people don't understand. here is another story charlie told me. she said when she was doing her live interview, she also went to see her then congressman from new hampshire. and she told her story. and the congressman said oh, but you're okay. you live in new hampshire. you're legally married in new hampshire. that's legal. so you're taken care of. so her congressman didn't even know that her wife was treated as a second class citizen and didn't enjoy the benefits that other military families enjoyed. so if the congressman didn't know, you know, the american public has no idea. so we need to continue telling charlie's story. >> the reason that i wanted to play that particular clip of her lobbying gene shaheen there, gene shaheen obviously somebody who has been very supportive of her. but
the pentagon and military posts have strong seasoned leadership teams. regardless of having the secretary or not having one is a portent concern. -- a point of concern. you have a good strong team that will be able to manage through this process. they have seen this coming. as you would expect the military to do, they are prepared. host: new hampshire, and the pennant caller -- caller: morning and thank you. i am so tired of the irresponsibility of the republicans. the chuck hagel thing is preposterous. how does it serve the nation to delay the president's choice? it is the first time in history that a filibuster has been used against a cabinet the sequester is the height of irresponsibility. why risk a potential double dip recession just so you can score political points? finally, you criticized the president for being out of washington and yet, -- that was and finally -- hear you are supporting a filibuster and finally, though you partly answer the question or just now, what your district and tails are large installations, i assume, other than fort campbell in your district. my brother
more about the pentagon. saying, quote, if confirmed i intend to know a lot more than i do. jonathan carl, abc news, the white house. >> not a great performance, as you heard. even from people who will vote for him or like him or fellow democrats, you know, who may vote for him. little more critical about the nation's military. does a person not have a right to go into a slaughterhouse and change their opinion on red meat? >> of course. >> republicans say this guy is further left than president obama. republicans are skittish about his nomination. >> people are saying though his performance, well he was really under fire. so i think anyone in that hot seat may not do his or her best they're saying he likely will be confirmed i suspect. >> it is going to be a bumpy ride. >>> in related news, secretary of state hillary clinton leaving office officially today after sounding a warning about civil war in syria. at a sort of exit interview, clinton accused iran of playing an increasingly prominent role directing violence in syria and says that only raises chances of a wider conflict in the
no auditable books in the pentagon. panetta, that's the one agency of government that has never submitted an audited set of books in history. >> bill: wow. >> not one -- and frankly by itself, that would i think provide an ability to really see where we're throwing money away. and again, secretary panetta, to his credit, has got a mandate within the four branches to basically say 2014, we've got to do this. frankly, it is going to be interesting to see if they can hit this goal. the size of the pentagon is bigger than 90 countries gdp. so but again so yes there's definitely smart savings that you can do there. again, i would go back to the afghanistan expenditure $2 billion a week we're spending over there. no one thinks we're going to have a combat mission after 2014. so you know, that's money that we're not going to be spending. and so really, the opportunities are there to avoid again by the way, the bipartisan policy center, "new york times" yesterday, said a million jobs will be lost if sequestration goes through. cbo says 1.4. >> bill: congressman, a lot of battles to fight. we're g
in an area not known for earthquakes. now the cia and pentagon are trying to learn much, much more about what happened in that test. want to bring in our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr. what have we learned from this? tell us what happened. >> reporter: well, you know, as you said, right now the intelligence community, the military, has to figure out what they know, what they suspect happened. think of this as csi north korea but not being able to go to the scene of the crime. what they're looking at is that seismic activity and trying to work their way backwards as to what happened. they believe now that this was, of course, an underground nuclear test, possibly several kilotons. but they need to get better analysis, they need to get air sampling, see what is now released into the atmosphere, and try and assess from all of that what happened. once they know that, the next set of questions, the next part of the investigation, how did north korea pull it off? where did they get help? did they get help? did they have the technology, the engineering expertise, fabrication to really do the
is served until 2009, and works in the pentagon. our first call, on the republican line. caller: my daughter serves in the marine corps. i'm very proud of my daughter. if we take and put our people out of afghanistan, what is going to prevent these people from going back over -- coming back over to our country, and a glowing us up again? we may have gotten rid of osama bin laden. what about everybody else? we have to protect our people, whether it is in afghanistan, africa, or wherever. we cannot allow our people totally out of this country just because president obama says, they are muslims, they are my fellow men, my fellow religion, i want our people out of there. that is not right. i come over to our country and try to kill us. we need to stay over there and fight for our freedom. host: you bring up interesting points. basic idea we have in this country is that we get into wars, but we very rapidly lose the ability to support those wars, political perspective. we saw what happened in vietnam. if desert storm last longer, we would have seen the same thing there. we know what happened with
is "usa today's" pentagon reporter. he wrote the article. welcome. >> good morning, carol. >> thanks so much for enlightening us on this issue. this program sends americans to iraq and afghanistan to win hearts and minds. tell us about sexual harassment, racism. outline these problems for us. >> these come in an army investigative report that we were -- we obtained through a freedom of information act request. the harassment seemed pretty gross. it was a contractor at the training base making really untoward comments toward the women. eventually, he was fired. that was documented. as well as racism. there was a white soldier who was referring to a section of the program and saying it was a ghetto because it had black people in it. that soldier was disciplined. >> yet some of the members of this group, with all the problems, were making more money than the secretary of defense? >> that's the most disturbing problem. it regards time sheet padding, and it was encouraged, apparently, according to the documents we found. these people were saying they routinely worked 84-hour weeks, billing f
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 66 (some duplicates have been removed)